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Word has probably gotten around about the dangers of fossil fuels and pollution in our air and environment. Efforts to counteract and even reverse some of these harmful effects include promoting environmental sustainability and finding efficient sources of energy.

The RCHS Greenhouse and Garden Club, advised by Mrs. McAllister, who is the AP Environmental and Farm to Fork teacher, grows food in the school garden in hopes of one day having students eating food grown on campus. The club has recently received a ten thousand dollar grant from PG&E Bright Ideas and with it they hope to one day have a bigger garden and recreational area.

“If we live sustainably and adopt more sustainable ways of living such as: growing our own gardens, buying our fresh food, even meat locally (Farm to Fork), recycling, choosing transportation that is environmentally friendly when possible, and living reduce, reuse and recycle as a motto for life, we can reduce the amount of pollution created,” says Mrs. McAllister.

Mrs. McAllister’s AP Environmental class has launched an informational campaign which involves bringing awareness to a number of yellow food waste bins placed around the cafeteria and quad area of the school. The food waste collected is used in a process called Biodigestion, and it works by recycling the food waste and organic material to produce natural gas.

“The ultimate goal of the Biodigestion project is to close the loop for renewable resources.  Farm to Fork to Fuel.  We grow food in the Garden and feed it to the students of RCHS, the students then dispose of the food waste into the yellow Biodigestion collection cans,” says Mrs. McAllister.

The food waste from the bins are collected by Atlas Disposal and taken to a Biodigestor in Sacramento to be converted into clean, natural gas to fuel our vehicles. Any compost that is left over after the 21 day process can be used again to support fruits and vegetables in a garden, including the RC school garden.

. Growing organic and unprocessed food is a step towards reducing the consumption of foreign processed food and ultimately aiding in the fight against pollution. This is crucial to preserving the environments capability to support human life and the planet’s natural ecosystems.

“This school is working to become more efficient, one step at a time,” says Deborah Bruns, a representative from the Yolo County Office of Education.

Mrs. McAllister believes that if people live more sustainably by growing their own food, or buying fresh food, recycling, and choosing environmentally friendly ways of transportation, then pollution and environmental harm can be lessened. This would ultimately help to spread the idea or “reducing, reusing, and recycling” and bring attention to the changes the planet is experiencing because of unhealthy human lifestyles.

“We start by caring enough to ask questions, daring to commit to a change that is more environmentally friendly and celebrating that the Earth matters, our futures matter and the generations to come need to depend on us to protect our Natural resources for them to have a healthy life worth living,” says Mrs. McAllister.

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